Security breaches are no big deal any more

Remember the Plame-Novak-Armitage affair, in which our media pretended they were outraged (outraged!) that someone might leak the name of a (nominally covert) intelligence employee to the press? Metric tons of ink were spent, there was a special prosecutor, there was even a movie.

What made that so hard to take was the rampant hypocrisy of the leftist media pretending they thought that exposing intelligence workers was a bad thing, when in fact they love to expose covert operations.

Now that the Bush administration is out of office, the media is back to not caring (or actively supporting) intelligence leaks. Thus, you won’t see much ink, a special prosecutor, or a movie on either of these stories:

It was the Obama administration that sealed the fate of the Pakistani doctor jailed for helping nail Usama Bin Laden, by divulging key details after the fact and dooming any chance Shakil Afridi’s cover story could win his freedom, according to a confidential Pakistani report.

When former Secretary of Defense and ex-CIA Director Leon Panetta publicly acknowledged Afridi’s role in the ruse which helped the CIA pinpoint Bin Laden’s presence in an Abbottabad compound, any chance that Pakistani authorities could help him get out of the country vanished, according to what some have called Pakistan’s version of the 9/11 Commission, a 357-page report from an independent body set up to probe the aftermath of the 2011 raid by Navy SEALs in which the Al Qaeda leader was killed.

and:

Former CIA Director Leon Panetta revealed the name of the Navy SEAL unit that carried out the Osama bin Laden raid and named the unit’s ground commander at a 2011 ceremony attended by “Zero Dark Thirty” filmmaker Mark Boal.

Panetta also discussed classified information designated as “top secret” and “secret” during his presentation at the awards ceremony, according to a draft Pentagon inspector general’s report published Wednesday by the Project on Government Oversight. . .

The leaked version of the report does not address whether Panetta knew Boal was present at the ceremony, held under a tent at the CIA complex on June 24, 2011. “Approximately 1,300” people from the military and the intelligence community were on hand for the event, according to a CIA press release issued the following week.

(Previous post.)

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